The Effect That Light Has On Colour – JDS DIY
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The Effect That Light Has On Colour

The direction a space faces is taken into account by certified interior designers and colour experts. The choice of colour scheme greatly depends on whether it is facing north, south, east, or west. A bedroom that faces east and receives strong morning sunlight, for example, may appear dramatically different when subsequently viewed in the evening under artificial lights. A west-facing room that glows warmly at night may appear drab in the morning. This should be considered when choosing colours.

The Effect That Light Has On Colour

Of course, not everyone can always have an ideal aspect. City apartments may receive little natural light and may be overlooked from all sides. While a room facing north may receive less sunlight than a room facing south or west, any space can be made to feel warm and inviting with the right lighting and colour schemes. The amount of light that is available inside a house might vary greatly depending on the architecture of the home you live in. Even though a country cottage may be located in an exceptionally sunny area, the interior may still feel dark and gloomy due to the low ceiling and small windows.

Modern homes will be considerably more impacted by these traits and seasonal fluctuations because of their huge open-plan layouts and large picture windows. The decor must be adaptable enough to take into account the variations if a living room has an adjacent patio or conservatory that is used as an additional seating area during the summer but not in the winter. Some of the finest interior designers advise painting a space white before making a final colour decision for folks who are unsure about lighting and colour schemes.

The Effect That Light Has On Colour

This will enable you to make the most of natural light when selecting a colour scheme by seeing how variations in the light affect an interior. The ceiling always seems darker than walls painted the same colour, making windows and walls appear darker because they only get reflected light. It is easier to see how curtains are affected by artificial lighting if a sample gauge of cloth is held upright and pleated. To show how various positions and lighting conditions might impact the colour, spread out samples on the floor and move them around the space.